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gcse_forces_types [2017/11/05 20:27]
rheadi created
gcse_forces_types [2017/11/05 20:29] (current)
rheadi
Line 30: Line 30:
 These two forces are called balanced forces because they are equal and opposite and nothing is changing. By this we mean they have the same magnitude but in exactly the opposite direction, and neither object is changing position. These two forces are called balanced forces because they are equal and opposite and nothing is changing. By this we mean they have the same magnitude but in exactly the opposite direction, and neither object is changing position.
  
-''{{:hammer_and_nail.jpg?nolink |}}Remember that although when two objects interact they exert equal and opposite forces on each other, the mass of the objects will determine the effect that occurs. For example if a hammer hits a nail with 50N of force downwards, the nail also hits the hammer with 50N of force upwards. Because the mass of the hammer is so much bigger than that of the nail, the forces have the effect of moving the nail downwards. It is important that you do not confuse forces and effects!''+{{:hammer_and_nail.jpg?nolink |}}''Remember that although when two objects interact they exert equal and opposite forces on each other, the mass of the objects will determine the effect that occurs. For example if a hammer hits a nail with 50N of force downwards, the nail also hits the hammer with 50N of force upwards. Because the mass of the hammer is so much bigger than that of the nail, the forces have the effect of moving the nail downwards. It is important that you do not confuse forces and effects!''
  
gcse_forces_types.txt ยท Last modified: 2017/11/05 20:29 by rheadi